The Nutrition of Tomatoes & Peppers

I never really think of tomatoes as being a nutrient dense food. But I thought it would be interesting to include it in our nutrition series, since so many of us love to eat them fresh from the garden. We read years ago that peppers contain many nutrients and trace minerals that you don’t find in most other foods.

1 cup of raw cherry tomatoes include the following nutrients. We don’t grow cherry tomatoes, but this is the one listing for raw tomatoes.

  • calories 28.6
  • carbohydrates 5.8g

  • protein 1.3g
  • vitamins A, C, K
  • folate
  • choline
  • calcium
  • magnesium
  • phosphorus
  • potassium
  • sodium
  • phytosterols
  • omega-3 & omega-6 fatty acids

1 cup of raw, sweet, green peppers include the following nutrients.
The nutritional content of jalapeno peppers is very similar to sweet peppers.

  • calories 29.8
  • carbohydrates 6.9g
  • protein 1.3g

  • vitamins A, C, K
  • folate
  • choline
  • calcium
  • phophorus
  • magnesium
  • potassium
  • phytosterols
  • omega-3 & omega-6 fatty acids


The list of nutrients here surprised me. I knew that tomatoes were not high in calories or carbohydrates, but I didn’t realize how many other benefits they included. It also surprised me to find out that tomatoes and peppers both provide very similar nutrients. So now when you make up that batch of pizza sauce or salsa, you will know how good it is for you.


When thinking of a survival garden and the nutrition it provides, tomatoes and peppers will not be rich in carbohydrates or calories for energy, but they both provide needed vitamins and minerals in larger amounts than some other vegetables. Something to think about. The size of garden you are able to tend successfully will determine what you are able to grow. That, along with the availability of seeds. Do you have some? Do you have enough? Make sure you have what you need, just in case you can’t get anymore.

This morning I was reading Rural Revolution and noticed that Patrice Lewis has had success with a short season corn. If this is of interest to you, please check it out. We talked about it, and even though we live in the south, we may be able to grow two crops. I think we will try it next year.

Until next time – Fern

10 thoughts on “The Nutrition of Tomatoes & Peppers

  1. That's a good thing to know, CQ. You are farther north than we are, so our weather may hold out a little longer. But the pests may be twice as bad by then. Good information, thank you.Fern

  2. Just to share we have tried the two crops of corn and for us that second crop is never yields what the first crop yields. The second crop ALWAYS suffers more from pests than the early spring crop does and although we do get some ears they have to be culled much heavier due to pests ( deer, coon and corn borer) Hugs CQ

  3. We have a friend that makes up fresh salsa that is easy to eat the whole jar in one setting. Once we came up with a good salsa recipe that we like, nothing else compares. I'm sure yours is the same way. Fresh, chilled and lots of it. Good luck with your harvest, Fiona.Fern

  4. Our Peppers have been slow here, well not just ours everyones….a cooler summer. However they are now officially loaded with green peppers and Ralph has had to actually stake a couple of the plants to help them handle the sheer weight of their fruit! I can now finally make Salsa. It is something everyone should make, it is easy and lets face it so much better than store Salsa! Yours looks lovely!

  5. That's great advice from your aunt, Rue. It's also good to see you have a head start on your seeds. I always keep the admonition, never plant your last seed, in the back of my mind, just in case the crop fails. I'm glad you enjoy your time here. Thank you for sharing.Fern

  6. Each year I always include tons of tomatoes and peppers for exactly these reasons that you've listed. Tomatoes are just so useful and nutritious as a base for so many dishes, they simply must be grown…salsa, lasagna, chili, spaghetti, minestrone…And peppers are such a good source of Vitamin C that I always grow lots of those. It's hard to get sufficient Vitamin C from a garden outside of Florida or California, citrus growing areas. Peppers, rose hips and broccoli are the best options I've found so far. It sure doesn't hurt that tomatoes and peppers are delicious to boot!Just Me

  7. I was thinking about seeds two weeks ago. so i order some that I need for next year from Seed Savers. I try to save my own but due to crop failure this year i need to order some.when growing up our aunt told us to can enough for 2 years because you never know when you will have a crop failure, as in this year. I've followed her advice all my gardening years.I enjoy your blog very much!Rue

  8. I see you use the same site for nutrient information that I do. If you use the down arrow where it shows '1 cup cherry tomatoes' you will find other choices such as one medium raw tomato. Also, cooked tomatoes have different values because cooking reduces the size so a cup of canned tomatoes no salt will have almost double the amount of calories and carbs & fiber. Remember that the net carb amount is the carb less the fiber. For diabetics the net carb count is what we're looking for.

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