The Incredible Pinto Bean

In these times of food uncertainty, nutrition and calories are paramount in my books. What I am going to write about pinto beans could generally apply to most shell beans, such as lima or navy. I have had some questions about canning pinto beans so I will include what I know and have experienced here.
First off, if you can find dry beans, I would recommend you buy them. As many as you can afford and find available. I tried to look up bulk pinto beans in preparation to write this article and find that many bulk providers are out, or only have one pound bags or like Amazon, who has a 24 pound bucket for $63.92!! or a 25 pound box for $57.69 or a 20 pound bag for $54.25. I am afraid most people cannot afford these prices. If you have waited this long to try to stock up some long term nutrition, I am afraid you probably waited too long.
We received an email with some information about bulk food items that may be useful to you. We appreciate the effort this person made in sharing a resource with all of us. Here is the email in part:
You mentioned, however, that bulk foods are getting difficult to find. I am LDS and have used the LDS Home Storage Centers for years. You may know all about them. But in case you don’t, they are open to everyone and carry bulk items. You can choose to buy 25 pound sacks of wheat or you can buy #10 cans of wheat in cases. You can buy it In a home storage center or you can buy it online and have it shipped to your home. They just want people to have food storage, so there is not a huge markup. Most of the packaging is done in Salt Lake by missionaries who are donating their labor. The older couples who run the centers are also donating their labor.
All of their locations are listed here:


Here is their product and price list:

Many of their items are out of stock with all of the crazy buying that has been happening over the last few months, but my local center has restocked many of the products that I use and my brother, who uses a center close to his home in Virginia, tells me they have many items back in stock as well. I just bought more white wheat, red wheat, elbow macaroni noodles, and spaghetti. So if you are interested, it is worth calling the center nearest to you and asking what they have in stock.

I don’t know if this is of any interest to you, but in times like this we should help each other however we can. 
Nutrition. Everyday, but now more than ever, I turn to foods I know will provide good nutrition. This will be crucial as food supplies continue to be impacted by the Plandemic and resulting economic disruptions. I use this website for comparing nutritional values on many foods.

As you can see, one cup of cooked pinto beans with water and salt packs a powerful punch, thus our preference for it. It is often said that beans and rice make the perfect protein. We don’t eat rice, but we do eat wheat in the form of sourdough bread or tortillas. We prefer wheat to rice for the comparative nutritional value the wheat provides.

We have a number of buckets of pinto beans that we have had for at least 10 years, which by the way, came from the LDS Home Storage Center in Oklahoma City. We bought in bulk and stored in our own buckets with Gamma Seal lids. If you’re not aware, LDS stands for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, or commonly called Mormons. I have long thought theses beans would be too hard to cook and eat, and that is true. I also thought they would be too hard to can. This is one of those instances that I was more than happy to be wrong.

Last winter I wanted to get more pintos canned and on the shelf for everyday eating, and to have if the country and world went south. I bought several four pound bags from Wal-Mart, before the virus when they were still available, and we canned a batch of 32 pints. Then recently, we decided to find out if those old beans were still usable. We put three pounds of beans in eight quarts of water and brought them to a boil in the late afternoon. Let them boil for five minutes, then let them sit until morning. I turned the fire on low when I got up around 6:00am and let them simmer until morning chores were done and we were ready to fire up the canner. Here are both types of beans. Both great, on the shelf and ready to eat. The 2010 beans turned out great, good texture and flavor. The older beans are on the left and the Wal-Mart beans are on the right in this picture. Some of the benefits of having beans canned and ready to go is that if you want a quick meal, or the world doesn’t allow time to cook a pot of beans, you have nutrition, water and salt ready to nurture your body.

This summer one of my goals is to grow, harvest and can as many pinto beans as possible. In a survival scenario we need calories for energy and adequate protein. Pinto beans provide 245 calories per cup, a healthy form of carbohydrates that does not cause an insulin spike with a quick drop off in energy, and a good level of protein. In my books, an excellent form of nutrition any time.

Our first harvest of beans yielded 10 1/2 pounds from about two 30 foot rows of plants. Now this is not equivalent to the same weight of dry beans because they were fresh. Some were partially dried, but most still retained a lot of moisture. We canned 32 pints with enough beans left over for another 3 pints. I was very pleased with the yield and hope the plants will continue to bloom and provide another harvest or two before fall.

To can fresh or dried beans, we bring them to a boil the evening before, then let them sit overnight. In the morning, simmer until ready to can. We use the liquid from the pot to fill the jars. In pint jars, fill with beans about 2/3 full, add 1/2 tsp. non-iodized salt, fill to within 1/2″ of the top with bean liquid, then pressure can at 10 pounds for 40 minutes. This timing comes from our Stocking Up canning book.

Jacob’s Cattle Beans

Something I learned about canning fresh beans as opposed to dried beans. Fresh beans tend to be much softer when you cook or can them. I prefer a bean with a more firm texture, like the old beans and the Wal-Mart beans. We grew Jacob’s Cattle beans a few years back. It’s another shell bean very similar to a pinto. We also canned them fresh and they were much softer, just like the pintos we just harvested and canned. I always thought the softness was just the nature of the Jacob’s bean and never thought about the difference in canning fresh instead of dried. Accidental learning can be a very interesting teacher. Now, instead of canning our next harvest fresh, I will dry them first and see if I can get the type of canned bean I prefer instead of the softer variety. One benefit of the soft beans is the ease at making a type of refried bean for tortillas. By the way, if you have trouble finding pinto bean seed to plant, the ones from Wal-Mart work just fine.

A few years back we tried a different method of canning beans we had read somewhere. In quart jars we added dried pinto beans to half of the jar, filled with boiling water and 1 tsp. salt, then canned according to recommended time (I don’t remember now how long.) They were tough and crunchy. I don’t know how old the beans were or any other details, but we found out for us, this process didn’t work.

Ground pork, pintos & salsa with sauteed cabbage

There are many different ways to add beans to a meal for a nutritional boost. I’ve already mentioned refried beans and a bowl of beans. You can add them to soup or to just about any dish. Like this. But folks, nutrition and energy is, and will be the name of the game as our future continues to unfold. I pray the day never comes that I can’t sit in my comfortable, air conditioned home and type on a computer on the internet. Just how much infrastructure has to remain in place for me to continue doing this? How long will it last?

We will never forget someone asking us why we go to all this work to raise and preserve our harvest. Why do all that work when you can just buy it at the store, they asked. Because now you have a hard time finding or affording the humble pinto bean at the store. Grow it or buy it, food is of utmost importance right now for everyone. Like I’ve said before, regardless of the events surrounding us, peace or anarchy, without food, you are dead.

Until next time – Fern

Got Food? For How Long?

If you don’t know how to provide food for yourself and anyone else that is depending on you by now, it may be too late to learn. You may just starve. Cheery thought, isn’t it?

What will millions of people do when the just-in-time deliveries of food stop? Stop as in never to be seen again? Seriously, what will happen? Right now there are so many trigger points leading to a collapse, the slightest wind could cause them to fall, and where they will land is anybody’s guess. The destruction that will be left in the wake of that landing will change the face of the world, permanently.

Let’s say you are preparing for disaster/collapse/anarchy/chaos and have a lot of food stored. That’s great. What are you going to do when it’s gone? We ask ourselves that. Regularly. So, what are you going to do when it’s gone? Turn into one of those starving zombie people that will do anything to take the food that belongs to someone else? Go to any lengths to stay alive? Is that your plan? I truly hope not.

Do you have plans for replenishing your food supply as you eat it? How will you do that? What if the stores are all closed and there are no more seeds? What if the electricity is off forever? What if there is no gasoline or diesel for all of the gardening equipment you currently depend on? Do you have canning jars, lids, rings, canners and a way to use them minus electricity, propane or natural gas? Do you have a root cellar? A solar dehydrator? Think ways to produce and preserve food and add those to the list.

Now think of how many people you plan to feed. Can these people help with the work that will have to be done to replenish your food supply? Will they be productive members of the group? 

Do you have livestock or access to a meat supply? This is assuming you have been able to protect these animals from other folks that need food as well. Hunting by now will probably be out of the question. The sheer number of hungry people will have seen to that not long after the collapse. Remember, any food you cook, especially meat will draw people like flies if they are within smelling distance. Just how good did that Thanksgiving meal smell while it was cooking today? Makes your stomach growl, doesn’t it? What if you and yours were starving and you smelled a meal cooking? The draw to that food would be irresistible, just like it would to others if you were the cook. Always remember that.

There will be many articles posted today about ways to use leftovers from Thanksgiving meals. Some of them will talk about making turkey broth from the carcass or other ways to extend the food supply from existing ‘leftovers’. Read them, ponder them, then try to apply them to a collapse situation. How many more meals can you get from the things you cook besides the original? Now think about the ingredients. Do you have plenty? Can you replenish those ingredients? How? How long will it take to grow that stalk of celery you want to put in your turkey soup? You want carrots, too? Do you have a place to grow them in abundance? Can you store them, can them, dehydrate them or preserve them in a ready made soup? What else to you need to provide adequate nutrition to live and work in a collapsed society? 

Lately I have been pondering how to provide food for the men that will be out hunting or patrolling for protection and security. What is an efficient, reusable, durable means of sending food? What kind of food? How much? Who will provide it? What about water? We used to put maple syrup in our coffee. What does that have to do with this conversation? Well, I kept the little jugs the syrup came in because they are very sturdy. They are big enough to hold a small meal of soup or dehydrated food and water. These jugs would be relatively easy to transport, clean up and reuse. 

Where would the water come from? That’s another thing to think about, a source of water that is easily accessible and potable. Are you going to need to filter your water? If so, can you for the long haul? 

I know that regardless of how much thought and preparation we put into being able to produce a food supply that is independently sustainable, there are things we will not be prepared for. There just will be. There will be times when we want to kick ourselves for not thinking of something that would make that work more manageable and productive. We have some friends that have had to face forced evacuation from wildfires and extended power outages this year. They took it in stride and learned from the experiences and the opportunity to practice and test their preparedness. It’s a great time to learn when failure is still an option.

As we give thanks for our many blessings, we continue to study what is approaching over the horizon. We enjoy this time in the sunshine, but can see the approaching darkness, thick with evil intent. The difficulty is in not knowing what shape or form it will take when it arrives at our door. This evil is a changeling and will manifest itself differently at different locations, for what will work in the country will not work in the cities and suburbs, and vice versa. Study, ponder, pray and pay attention. Do everything you can to be ready, for keeper of the gate has welcomed the invasion of those that will help take your freedoms, which is another topic in itself.

Until next time – Fern

Prepping the Garden for Fall, Part 1

We have started preparing the garden for planting fall crops, but we’re not finished yet. I have a few pictures of the beginning, but we probably won’t get it finished up until Saturday when I hope to get many, many wonderful, miraculous little seeds planted. I am always in awe of how a tiny little seed can turn into so much food. It is truly a miracle to me. 


It is really nice to see the tall grass down and turning brown in the hot sun. I hope to rake it up and remove it so we can run the disc through there again before I plant. I’ll give you another update when we get it finished. Due to several upcoming obligations, it will take a few more days than I would like. Some of the crops I will be planting are 120 days to maturity, like peanuts and Mangel beets, which means our window of opportunity is closing soon. Our first average frost date is October 31st, so July 31st is my very latest goal date. I hope I make it.


Keep your eyes and ears open. Listen for that inspiration that will lead you the next step you need to take in your preparations. And remember, you can never have too many seeds. Never. They will be more precious than anything made of metal. You can’t eat metal, but you can feed yourself with seeds. Never plant the last of your seeds. What if you have a year like it has been here and just to get anything to grow you have to replant two or three times? What if a storm destroys your plants like it did to CQ from Hickory Holler? (She is on our blogroll.) What if insects destroy some of your crops? What if you are planning on that food to get you through the winter? Will you make it? Really inventory what you have and determine what you need, then get it and store it along with the information you need on how to grow, harvest, preserve both fruit and seeds, then inventory again. I am.

Until next time – Fern

Norms Are Changing

Hi Everybody, Frank here.

We live in a society where we can go down to the local supermarket and buy fresh vegetables and fruits of almost any variety, from almost anywhere on the planet, any day of the week. Is this a good thing? Of course it is. Has it always been this way? Absolutely not. I love going to the grocery store and being able to find what used to be considered exotic items, that are now the norm. Here is where the problem lies. The problem lies with the word norm or normal.

You see, norm hasn’t always been the same norm. What was my father’s normal was a whole lot different than his father’s normal. To me, air conditioning is normal. When my father was a young man, most people didn’t have air conditioning. When his father was young, that would be my grandfather, air conditioning as I know it, did not exist. My father used to sleep outside in the hot summer. That was the norm for him where he lived. How many people do you know now that sleep outside on hot summer nights? I don’t mean kids playing, I mean adults. That would probably be zero, wouldn’t it? 

Getting back to the main idea here. What was normal 100 years ago, which would be about the time my grandfather was born, is vastly different than the normal where I live today. We’re not just talking about ethics and morals, I’m talking about things we take for granted everyday. Simple things that you and I take for granted that in my grandfather’s time, was a chore to produce these simple things, like food.

In my house, I have food from all over the world. In my grandfather’s house, they had food from their garden. If they didn’t grow it, they didn’t eat it. They grew it, picked it, preserved it, and that’s what they had to live on until the next harvest came around. I doubt very seriously that my grandfather, until he was probably 40 years old, had ever eaten an Alaskan salmon. Can you remember the stories about people receiving an apple at Christmas? That was a big deal to them. What’s an apple now days? I can go down to the local supermarket and have a choice of 10 varieties, 365 days a year. 

Some of us can see what is coming, and we need to think about a different norm.  Most of us have only seen society on an upwardly mobile path. If things were to change, for whatever the reason, we would experience something that few in our current society have ever seen. It won’t be a backwards movement, it will still be a forward movement, it will just be in a downward direction instead of upward. Let that soak in for a while. We’re are heading into uncharted waters.


This morning I was reading SurvivalBlog, which I do daily, and the main article today set with me and just wouldn’t go away. I would ask you to take the time to read this article. There is nothing flashy about it, there aren’t any major revelations that will come out of it, it just hit a chord with me. I want to thank Mr. Rawles for his blog site, and I want to thank the author of this story today. I would encourage you to read it. It is an easy read. The direct link is below.

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Prepping Like It’s 1920, by G.S.

 

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We all need to be vigilant, and pay very close attention to our surroundings. Something bad is out there. Things just don’t feel right. Please read the article.

We’ll talk more later, Frank

Wakey! Wakey! The Wolf Is At The Door – A Re-Post

Hello, Frank here.

A while back we started experimenting with re-posting some articles that are over a year old. The response has been fairly positive. We try to do one every couple of weeks, and since my wife is having surgery today, this would qualify as the premier day for a re-post. On another note, our blog is less than two years old, and the readership has steadily increased. For that we are truly thankful. So, every now and then we would like to reintroduce some of our older work that you may not have had the opportunity to read. I really hope you enjoy this one.

We’ll talk more later. Frank

Originally posted October 23, 2013

Wakey! Wakey! The Wolf Is At The Door


Hello, Frank here.

Let’s talk. Since my name is not Fern, then this article is going to have a slightly different slant to it. This is going to sound like a rant, because that’s what it is. Rants are not always organized and structured or in a pleasant flow. So, please bear with me.

I read lots of stories, articles or other rants that believe that the collapse that’s coming will be similar in nature to the collapse that occurred during the late 1920’s. Okay, some of my numbers here are not going to be precise, they are going to be rounded off. Maybe up, or maybe down, but you will get the general idea, if you have the ability to think. So, if I say 70% and it was actually 60% or maybe 80%, then please bear with me. Remember, this is a rant.

Back to the late 1920’s. The population of the United States was much smaller than it is today. The majority of the people still lived on a farm, let’s say 80%. Therefore, 20% of the people lived in

larger cities. Now remember, people in rural areas did not have electricity in the 1920’s or 30’s. Most of the people in rural areas raised most of their own food. Summer, winter, spring, fall they ate what came out of the earth. Many, many rural people were what we would call today, dirt poor. My information source here, was my father. He and his brother did not wear shoes for most of the winter and never wore shoes during the summer. So, he is my source of data, along with census data. 

So. Most people lived in the country. Most people raised their own food. Most people didn’t have electricity and everything that is associated with electricity. There were significantly fewer people in the United States. And many current authors tell us that we will get through this next depression or collapse or tyrannical government or whatever you want to call it, just like we got through the 1920’s collapse.

Now let’s look at today. We have a much larger population. That means more mouths to feed. The vast majority of people live in cities or suburbs, which conversely means, that very few people live in rural America, or on  

the farm. Almost everybody has electricity. So, what does this mean? Since the majority of people live in cities, that means that few, if any, raise their own food. Few or none, know how to preserve their own food,and all buy their food at the grocery store. Now those few that live in the country, are not living on a farm. For the benefit of discussion, yes, there are a handful that still live on a farm. But how many of that handful continue to raise all of their own food? Of that small handful, how many know how to preserve their own food? Get the picture here? 

It doesn’t matter what type of shutdown, collapse or apocalyptic event is GOING to occur, there is not going to be enough food to feed the

massive numbers of people, not even remotely close. Even in rural areas, extremely rural areas, most people have no idea how to raise, process and store food. And now, throw into the equation, there won’t be any electricity. So, all that meat you have stored in the freezer on the top of your refrigerator, sitting beside the popsicles and burritos will turn into stinking mush in about three days. 

Ladies and gentlemen. We are in significant trouble. Let me say that again. We are in a situation that we cannot recover from. I know folks that say

that they are going to go live in the forest and live off the land. Wake-y, Wake-y here fool! I know veteran, hard core, experienced hunters that laugh when they hear people say, and pardon me, unbelievably stupid things like that. There are many, many stories about mostly men, that have gone out into bush Alaska and had something to prove. Somebody normally finds them later. Going and living in the woods and hunting and feeding your family is not going to happen. 

Remember those people in the cities? They’re just going to go out and live with somebody in the country. A farmer, right? I hope they like 10,000 acres of soybeans or corn or milo or even wheat. They don’t need a farmer, what they need is a gardener and most farmers don’t raise gardens because they go to the grocery store and buy it. 

Before the shortages of guns and bullets lots of people thought that the idea of survival was who had the most guns and the most bullets. Some of these people watch way too much television. I know people that have never shot a gun that were buying guns and bullets. Like others write, buying a surf board, does not make you a surfer. Buying a gun does not make you a hunter, or give you the ability to pull the trigger when you need to. These are false delusions of illusions. 

Look at some of the facts presented above about population densities, and food production or preservation. Don’t get me wrong. I like guns and I like bullets, but I like shovels, hoes and seeds a whole lot better. I have even known people to buy these cans and five gallon buckets that have these survival seeds packed inside and they

wouldn’t no more know how to raise a garden than they would to fly a space shuttle. Can they learn to garden? Yes. Can they learn to fly a space shuttle? I guess so. I know 80 year old women that still wonder why their tomatoes make one year and the next year they don’t and they’ve been gardening for 65 years. I’m not saying that a bucket full of seeds is a bad thing. That reminds me. Where is my seed catalog? But gardening is an art, a skill, not something to be mastered in one year. The person that thinks they are going to raise a garden and produce food for their family in one year, got off the same bus as the guy that is going to go live in the forest and feed his family.

I hurt for those that can’t see or feel what is coming. There are signs everywhere, just look around. Our economy is in dismal, dismal shape and I live in a part of the world that is in pretty good shape. Look at society. Look at the stuff you do see on television or read in the news. Society is collapsing. The EBT cards shut down for a few hours. Can you imagine

what society will be like when the EBT cards shut down permanently? Our government leaders. Look at what’s happening in state capitals around our country. Look at some of the things that are happening that our parents and grandparents would have never thought possible.  There is a term called ‘normalcy bias’. Basically, this means what we learn to accept over time as normal. Our society is in serious, serious trouble. There are things that I cannot say in this blog that when I was a child, people went to jail for, what today is normal. We have perversion crammed down our throats everyday. This is normal. 

Okay. Let’s see. Our economy cannot be saved. Okay. Next. Society

can’t be saved. Our political arena is unbelievably corrupt and is a massive cesspool. This next statement is only going to be said once, listen carefully. Christianity is under attack worldwide. That means here, in the United Sates, Christianity is under attack also. The future does not look good for it’s survival. Pay attention. We are under attack.

Now, let me go back to the first part of this rant. Many writers will tell you that we survived the Great Depression and we will survive the next one too. And these are the people giving you the bad news. Not to mention those that are telling us that everything is okay and that “things are getting better”. I borrowed that last line from the Postman. Folks, we are in serious, serious trouble and I really don’t know if we are going to survive this. The world is not going to be the same world when this thing happens. Hold your family close. Prepare yourself mentally, physically, spiritually and temporally and with the help of God we will do the best we can.

That’s it for now. Maybe we’ll talk more later. It’s time to wake-y wake-y.

Frank

The High Cost of Food

There have been a few things in the news lately debating whether or not we are having inflation here in our country. Since they have removed the cost of food, among other things, from the formula, the debate has become somewhat irrelevant. Not only has the cost of food gone up, if you really look, you also find that the food supply is being impacted as well. 

Unbeknownst to most people there are illnesses and environmental affects that are impacting the mortality rate or productivity of a variety of food products. Pork is being devastated in many areas by the  porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) virus that kill piglets at a very high rate. Shrimp prices have risen 61% since last year, because of early mortality syndrome which is a

bacterial disease. Zero Hedge has charts showing the rising costs of beef, pork and shrimp. This visual gives an even clearer picture of the nonexistent inflation for just these three food products.

The drought conditions that have existed for several years now in Texas and California, just to name a few large food producing states, are having an incremental impact not only on the cost of food, but on the availability of some products in general. Many Texas cattle producers had to reduce the

size of their herds dramatically to stay in business at all when the drought was at it’s worst. And their drought is not over, by the way. This article clearly points out how the cost of beef is affecting everyone, from the prices at restaurants, to your kitchen table. How many families have had to limit their intake of meat due to rising costs? How many people have gone to buying the cheaper processed food products to fill in the gaps? When the cost of fixing a hotdog or hamburger for your children gets to be a luxury, then what?

According to Food Business News, the bread basket in the middle of our country is seeing the affects of our unusually cold and prolonged winter weather this year. Corn crops in some parts of the country have had to be delayed because the weather is too cold and wet to plant. There are areas in Kansas and Nebraska that are experiencing drought conditions which may impact their wheat production this year. There are also some areas that the winter kill of wheat has not been determined yet.

And then, there is the drought in California which has been written about in many places. It still amazes me that there is any debate at all on choosing

between food production and the habitat of a fish or bird, but that appears to be the case. One thing is for certain. The water supply in California for the major food producing areas is dwindling at an ever increasing rate, be it the aquifers, snow melt, rain fall or the reservoir or lake levels, they are running out of water. Thus, another area of the country is experiencing shortages in production and increasing costs that are being passed on to the consumers. The Wall Street Journal recently had an article with a very interesting graph. It gives a visual for many of the statistics we keep hearing about.


If these projections come to pass and continue following these trends, what will that mean for your family food budget? How will it affect what you put on the table for the family meal? Will you be able to sustain your current standard of living? If not, what will you cut to make up the difference? How deep will you have to cut?

July 2013

This is yet another important message to all of us. The time to become more self-reliant is here. If you haven’t already started to learn about producing some of your own food, I would recommend you do so without delay. There are so many different ways to produce some of your own food, from growing sprouts by the kitchen sink, to container gardening on your patio, deck or in the back yard. We have had several people comment here about growing vegetables in containers because of where they live or their ability to work in a garden. Stay aware and informed of what is happening around your neck of the woods and in the nation. The world has become less stable than it has been in years past and the need for vigilance has never been greater. Remember one of Frank’s favorite quotes, “I’d rather be a prepared fool, than an unprepared fool.” It could make all the difference in the world.

Until next time – Fern

Wake-y! Wake-y! The Wolf Is At The Door

Hello, Frank here.

Let’s talk. Since my name is not Fern, then this article is going to have a slightly different slant to it. This is going to sound like a rant, because that’s what it is. Rants are not always organized and structured or in a pleasant flow. So, please bear with me.

I read lots of stories, articles or other rants that believe that the collapse that’s coming will be similar in nature to the collapse that occurred during the late 1920’s. Okay, some of my numbers here are not going to be precise, they are going to be rounded off. Maybe up, or maybe down, but you will get the general idea, if you have the ability to think. So, if I say 70% and it was actually 60% or maybe 80%, then please bear with me. Remember, this is a rant.

Back to the late 1920’s. The population of the United States was much smaller than it is today. The majority of the people still lived on a farm, let’s say 80%. Therefore, 20% of the people lived in

larger cities. Now remember, people in rural areas did not have electricity in the 1920’s or 30’s. Most of the people in rural areas raised most of their own food. Summer, winter, spring, fall they ate what came out of the earth. Many, many rural people were what we would call today, dirt poor. My information source here, was my father. He and his brother did not wear shoes for most of the winter and never wore shoes during the summer. So, he is my source of data, along with census data. 

So. Most people lived in the country. Most people raised their own food. Most people didn’t have electricity and everything that is associated with electricity. There were significantly fewer people in the United States. And many current authors tell us that we will get through this next depression or collapse or tyrannical government or whatever you want to call it, just like we got through the 1920’s collapse.

Now let’s look at today. We have a much larger population. That means more mouths to feed. The vast majority of people live in cities or suburbs, which conversely means, that very few people live in rural America, or on  

the farm. Almost everybody has electricity. So, what does this mean? Since the majority of people live in cities, that means that few, if any, raise their own food. Few or none, know how to preserve their own food,and all buy their food at the grocery store. Now those few that live in the country, are not living on a farm. For the benefit of discussion, yes, there are a handful that still live on a farm. But how many of that handful continue to raise all of their own food? Of that small handful, how many know how to preserve their own food? Get the picture here? 

It doesn’t matter what type of shutdown, collapse or apocalyptic event is GOING to occur, there is not going to be enough food to feed the

massive numbers of people, not even remotely close. Even in rural areas, extremely rural areas, most people have no idea how to raise, process and store food. And now, throw into the equation, there won’t be any electricity. So, all that meat you have stored in the freezer on the top of your refrigerator, sitting beside the popsicles and burritos will turn into stinking mush in about three days. 

Ladies and gentlemen. We are in significant trouble. Let me say that again. We are in a situation that we cannot recover from. I know folks that say

that they are going to go live in the forest and live off the land. Wake-y, Wake-y here fool! I know veteran, hard core, experienced hunters that laugh when they hear people say, and pardon me, unbelievably stupid things like that. There are many, many stories about mostly men, that have gone out into bush Alaska and had something to prove. Somebody normally finds them later. Going and living in the woods and hunting and feeding your family is not going to happen. 

Remember those people in the cities? They’re just going to go out and live with somebody in the country. A farmer, right? I hope they like 10,000 acres of soybeans or corn or milo or even wheat. They don’t need a farmer, what they need is a gardener and most farmers don’t raise gardens because they go to the grocery store and buy it. 

Before the shortages of guns and bullets lots of people thought that the idea of survival was who had the most guns and the most bullets. Some of these people watch way too much television. I know people that have never shot a gun that were buying guns and bullets. Like others write, buying a surf board, does not make you a surfer. Buying a gun does not make you a hunter, or give you the ability to pull the trigger when you need to. These are false delusions of illusions. 

Look at some of the facts presented above about population densities, and food production or preservation. Don’t get me wrong. I like guns and I like bullets, but I like shovels, hoes and seeds a whole lot better. I have even known people to buy these cans and five gallon buckets that have these survival seeds packed inside and they

wouldn’t no more know how to raise a garden than they would to fly a space shuttle. Can they learn to garden? Yes. Can they learn to fly a space shuttle? I guess so. I know 80 year old women that still wonder why their tomatoes make one year and the next year they don’t and they’ve been gardening for 65 years. I’m not saying that a bucket full of seeds is a bad thing. That reminds me. Where is my seed catalog? But gardening is an art, a skill, not something to be mastered in one year. The person that thinks they are going to raise a garden and produce food for their family in one year, got off the same bus as the guy that is going to go live in the forest and feed his family.

I hurt for those that can’t see or feel what is coming. There are signs everywhere, just look around. Our economy is in dismal, dismal shape and I live in a part of the world that is in pretty good shape. Look at society. Look at the stuff you do see on television or read in the news. Society is collapsing. The EBT cards shut down for a few hours. Can you imagine

what society will be like when the EBT cards shut down permanently? Our government leaders. Look at what’s happening in state capitals around our country. Look at some of the things that are happening that our parents and grandparents would have never thought possible.  There is a term called ‘normalcy bias’. Basically, this means what we learn to accept over time as normal. Our society is in serious, serious trouble. There are things that I cannot say in this blog that when I was a child, people went to jail for, what today is normal. We have perversion crammed down our throats everyday. This is normal. 

Okay. Let’s see. Our economy cannot be saved. Okay. Next. Society

can’t be saved. Our political arena is unbelievably corrupt and is a massive cesspool. This next statement is only going to be said once, listen carefully. Christianity is under attack worldwide. That means here, in the United Sates, Christianity is under attack also. The future does not look good for it’s survival. Pay attention. We are under attack.

Now, let me go back to the first part of this rant. Many writers will tell you that we survived the Great Depression and we will survive the next one too. And these are the people giving you the bad news. Not to mention those that are telling us that everything is okay and that “things are getting better”. I borrowed that last line from the Postman. Folks, we are in serious, serious trouble and I really don’t know if we are going to survive this. The world is not going to be the same world when this thing happens. Hold your family close. Prepare yourself mentally, physically, spiritually and temporally and with the help of God we will do the best we can.

That’s it for now. Maybe we’ll talk more later. It’s time to wake-y wake-y.

Frank